What Retirement Can Look like Emotionally and Psychologically

By | Biltmore, Blog, Coping, Depression, Goals, Happiness, Retirement | No Comments

When most of us think about retirement, we think about how much money we have saved and invested over the years. Will we have enough income to live comfortably when we retire? We spend most of our lives saving as much extra money as we can, and being reminded by our banks and retirement agencies that we need to stay on track.

One thing that we do not seem to prepare for when retirement approaches, are the emotional and psychological aspects of retiring. You have spent your entire life working and having a career, to suddenly be out of that space can sometimes be a shock to your system and identity.

You were once busy all day long, and now you find yourself with endless amounts of time on your hands. People start to realize their lifetime goal of a happy retirement, has now become a reality filled with disappointment, loneliness, and often sadness.

This doesn’t happen to everyone of course, but for those who do experience this can feel the need to keep it quiet. They feel like they have done something wrong to feel disappointment instead of  happiness in retirement. Everyone keeps telling them how wonderful it must be, when they are thinking how terrible it has been.

So how do you prepare for retirement emotionally and psychologically? According to the American Psychological Association and the article by By Jamie Chamberlin, there are a few things you can do to ease into this new lifestyle.

Finding part time work, or self employment is always a great idea. Having some sort of schedule, or side work can make someone feel like they are still participating in the work force but at a slower pace.

Taking up a hobby in retirement can be particularly rewarding, and can fill some time in your schedule. Have you always wanted to take up painting? Yoga? Cooking? Take a few classes, and see where it takes you!

Have you had a trip in mind that you always wanted to take but never had the chance? Start traveling.

The important thing is that as you prepare for retirement or are settling into retirement, you are aware that emotionally it might take some time to get used to. This is normal. It is okay to feel like you miss your “old life”. It is okay to feel angry, disappointed, and that you have nothing left. Retirement is emotionally like what your life was like before retirement, it is what you make of it. It is your mindset and your outlook on it. And that can always be changed!

Suicide Prevention

5 Simple Steps to Help Prevent Suicide

By | Anxiety, Biltmore, Blog, Communication, Coping, Depression, Grief & Loss, Mental Health, PTSD, Stress, Suicide | No Comments

Earlier in the week we shared a TED Talk about how to start a conversation about suicide. In the last few months we have had a number of big name celebrities die from suicide. Our media once again has become saturated with those who many of us look up to and their decision to take their own lives.

Whether you think that posting about it, talking about it, or sharing about it glorifies suicide or supports prevention, there are a few basic steps we all need to be reminded of to help someone close to use who might be struggling.

According to Elana Premack Sandler L.C.S.W, M.P.H and her article on Psychology Today, there are 5 simple steps for suicide prevention.

  1. Ask
  2. Keep Them Safe
  3. Be There
  4. Help Them Connect
  5. Follow Up

It is hard to know what to do when someone we love has started to talk about suicide. Do we talk to them about it? Do we call for help? Do we ignore it and hope it goes away? Do we force them to get help?

These days there are a number of suicide prevention numbers and hotlines to call. 1-800-273-8255 is the National Suicide Hotline, and here in Arizona there is a local number called Empact 1-480-784-1514

But when you are close to someone and see them struggling, it’s easy to be unsure of what to do. These 5 simple steps are easy to remember, and can help someone you love get the help they need. Sometimes we are afraid of asking if someone is thinking about taking their own life, but we need to ask these tough questions. It opens the door for our loved ones to know that we care about them, and are concerned. When we take action to keep them safe, we can keep a situation from escalating. We can keep them on the phone, go over to their house if possible, send a neighbor or a friend over while we are connecting them with phone numbers or other resources for help.

It is important to follow up with our loved one and ask them how they are doing. By following up we are letting that person know we care about their long term health and happiness, and are willing to step in to keep them safe.

If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, please give them the Empact Crisis Line phone number 1-480-784-1514 or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline 1-800-273-8255

We are here to help as well. If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, call our office at 1-480-999-7070.

 

 

Thermometer showing hot temperatures and blue skies

How the heat can impact our mood

By | Anxiety, Biltmore, Blog, Depression, Mental Health | No Comments

If you are in Arizona right now, then you are completely aware of how hot it is! It’s Summer time in the desert right? The temperatures are constantly in the triple digits, and the sun is blaring down on us every day.

Do you ever feel like the heat is impacting your mood, or your emotions, or your behavior? If you do, there is some thought behind that. According to John M Grohol, Psy D and his article on Psych Central, there is research that shows that heat waves can lead to more aggressive and violent behavior, as well as more findings of substance abuse in the hotter temperatures.

When people are hot, their anxiety seems to go down, while their depression seems to go up. And we’ve all surely experienced being extra tired, lethargic, and low energy with the increase in temperatures.

As always the best advice when it’s so hot it is affecting you psychologically, is to get indoors where it’s cool and stay hydrated. Often waiting until you feel thirsty is too late when it comes to hydrating. There are also certain health conditions that worsen in the heat, like Multiple Sclerosis. Make sure you and those around you are aware of how the heat affects these conditions, and how to keep symptoms at bay.

There are some people who are not bothered by extreme weather changes, and who welcome to different seasons. And there are a lot of people whose moods and emotions change positively or negatively with the seasons. If you’re feeling like some of this extreme heat is affecting you in a negative way, our Counselors here at Biltmore Psychology and Counseling are happy to help with certain coping and management tools!

Dr. Sheri Clark, PhD

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) with Dr Sheri Clark

By | Anxiety, Biltmore, Blog, Coping, Depression, EMDR, PTSD | No Comments

We would like to highlight our very own Dr Sheri Clark, who does wonderful work in the area of anxiety and trauma. While all of our Counselors here see clients who are in need of services related to anxiety, depression and trauma in the past, Dr Clark completed the lengthy requirements for the Basic Training for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is an integrative psychotherapy treatment that has shown great success in patients suffering from traumatic events. It was developed to help distressing memories associated with a particularly traumatic event from ones life.  EMDR has been extremely beneficial to people of all ages and helped to relieve psychological stressors.

Further, according to EMDR International Association EMDR is designated as an effective treatment by the American Psychiatric Association, the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and many other international health agencies.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with Dr Clark, or want to read more about her you can visit our website or call the office at 480-999-7070